All That Nibbles Is Not Gold

Don't mind me. I'm Just posting stuff.

Jan 12

I can’t wait to scream this song at the top of my lungs With Jonathan. “men if you’ve been assured there’s a way to live the valley of your forefathers gave you
prepare to be told “that shits gay dude”

(via hwhl-deactivated20131230)



This just proves that dieting and lifting in the gym works. I know I’m not to impressive yet but just thought I’d share. We’re all gonna make it brah.. And as always SQUAT LOWER AND DEADLIFT MORE.


Jan 10
Mirin’ hard

Mirin’ hard

(via noweakbitch)


Dec 20

thesciencellama:

Decreasing suck…Increasing Awesome - Hank Green


If NASA could land a 1,900 pound science lab on Mars - millions of miles away! - with 0.46% of the US annual budget, imagine what sort of SCIENCE could be accomplished with 1% or a Penny.

Looks like there only needs to be about 12,000 more signatures to get this done by January 4, 2013. How much would YOU pay for the UNIVERSE?

Penny4NASA.org 

(via we-are-star-stuff)


aesthtics:

Quotes that promote apathy are best not quoted at all.

aesthtics:

Quotes that promote apathy are best not quoted at all.

(via aesthtics-deactivated20130308)


Dec 17
We’re all gonna make it brah.

We’re all gonna make it brah.

(via acomputervirus-deactivated20131)



Oct 13

(via cubansmiles)


Oct 9

The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality
In the basement of the Northwest Science Building here at Harvard University, a locked door is marked with a pink and yellow sign: “Caution: Radioactive Material.” Inside researchers buzz around wearing dour expressions and plastic gloves. Among them is Kenneth Hayworth. He’s tall and gaunt, dressed in dark-blue jeans, a blue polo shirt, and gray running shoes. He looks like someone who sleeps little and eats less.
Hayworth has spent much of the past few years in a windowless room carving brains into very thin slices. He is by all accounts a curious man, known for casually saying things like, “The human race is on a beeline to mind uploading: We will preserve a brain, slice it up, simulate it on a computer, and hook it up to a robot body.” He wants that brain to be his brain. He wants his 100 billion neurons and more than 100 trillion synapses to be encased in a block of transparent, amber-colored resin—before he dies of natural causes.
Why? Ken Hayworth believes that he can live forever.
But first he has to die.
“If your body stops functioning, it starts to eat itself,” he explains to me one drab morning this spring, “so you have to shut down the enzymes that destroy the tissue.” If all goes according to plan, he says cheerfully, “I’ll be a perfect fossil.” Then one day, not too long from now, his consciousness will be revived on a computer. By 2110, Hayworth predicts, mind uploading—the transfer of a biological brain to a silicon-based operating system—will be as common as laser eye surgery is today.

I want to do this with my body.

The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality

In the basement of the Northwest Science Building here at Harvard University, a locked door is marked with a pink and yellow sign: “Caution: Radioactive Material.” Inside researchers buzz around wearing dour expressions and plastic gloves. Among them is Kenneth Hayworth. He’s tall and gaunt, dressed in dark-blue jeans, a blue polo shirt, and gray running shoes. He looks like someone who sleeps little and eats less.

Hayworth has spent much of the past few years in a windowless room carving brains into very thin slices. He is by all accounts a curious man, known for casually saying things like, “The human race is on a beeline to mind uploading: We will preserve a brain, slice it up, simulate it on a computer, and hook it up to a robot body.” He wants that brain to be his brain. He wants his 100 billion neurons and more than 100 trillion synapses to be encased in a block of transparent, amber-colored resin—before he dies of natural causes.

Why? Ken Hayworth believes that he can live forever.

But first he has to die.

“If your body stops functioning, it starts to eat itself,” he explains to me one drab morning this spring, “so you have to shut down the enzymes that destroy the tissue.” If all goes according to plan, he says cheerfully, “I’ll be a perfect fossil.” Then one day, not too long from now, his consciousness will be revived on a computer. By 2110, Hayworth predicts, mind uploading—the transfer of a biological brain to a silicon-based operating system—will be as common as laser eye surgery is today.

I want to do this with my body.

(via we-are-star-stuff)


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